Constructing the Lion’s Den Shelter

We recently received photos and materials related to CCC work at Durango, Camp SP-16-C. This report on the construction of the shelter at Reservoir Hill, known today as the Lion’s Den, provides great details to go with step-by-step photos received recently from the collection of Barbara Teyssier Forrest, daughter of the project supervisor, Edward Teyssier. See also La Plata County profile.

For photos and the rest of the story, see Lion’s Den Shelter, under Projects.

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CCC Exhibit in Aurora ends Oct 5, 2013

exhibit0441Forgive the late notice. The Aurora History Museum exhibit on the Civilian Conservation Corps continues through October 5th. Worth checking out, the exhibit includes many excellent, rarely seen photos from Colorado State Archives, as well as some from Denver Mountain Parks and Mile High Chapter 7 collections.

Last week, we went to the museum to present a talk on the CCC’s role in developing parks in the Front Range, called “From Poverty to Parks.” For this brown bag session, the room filled to capacity and those present seemed to appreciate the information provided. We even met a former CCC enrollee who shared his story! I hope to have excerpts from the presentation online here within a couple of weeks.

Contributions from the Loveland Historical Society, the University of Colorado Boulder Visual Resource Center, and other online sources enabled us to present a reasonably coherent view of park development from Fort Collins to Trinidad, Colorado. Of course, the MHC7 collections complemented the effort. I expect to be taking the presentation to Loveland next spring, and we’re available to share it elsewhere in the Front Range region as well. Email us at milehighchapter7 AT gmail DOT com to plan a presentation.

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What’s next? How about a project to capture our own photos of CCC-built features in the Front Range? Please send us photos you capture of historic CCC sites in Colorado to help us create a complete story of the CCC in Colorado. (We know this is a long-term project!)

p.s. The “Wolves and Wild Lands” exhibit next to the CCC one is well worth visiting too!

Want to see a CCC Camp?

Did you know the Mt. Morrison CCC Camp is, as far as we can determine, the most intact surviving camp in Colorado? You can arrange to tour the camp by contacting Denver Mountain Parks (dennis.brown AT denvergov.org, or leave a message at 720.865.0900.)

Read more at Visiting a CCC Camp.

New page shares “Perspectives”

Every now and then, we run across material in our research that helps us latter-day Americans understand what it was like to serve in the Civilian Conservation Corps. Today, we created a new “Perspective” page to share quotes and writings from the 1930s that help us empathize with those who served and gain a better idea of their lives in the CCC.

We hope you like it!

Loveland Camp SP-9-C

Thanks to extensive research and other efforts by Sharon Danhauer, of the Loveland Historical Society, we have now posted a camp profile for Namaqua Camp, SP-9-C. Although the camp itself is gone, Sharon did a great job documenting the buildings in Loveland Mountain Park that were built by the men of Namaqua Camp in 1935.

The CCC in Colorado

We’re moving here to expand what we have to offer as resources on CCC camps, companies, and projects in Colorado. Please bear with us as we get this new site up and running, or visit our original blog at Colorado CCC (V 1.0 on blogger), where a record of our previous activities is archived.

With more than 100 camps across the state, Colorado benefitted directly and diversely from efforts of the CCC. We’ve posted a couple stories already, but have many more to come!

Thanks for stopping by; please come again and help us honor the men who created a great CCC legacy here in Colorado.